Use of medicinal plants by Neanderthals discovered


The Heritage Trust

 
Reconstruction of a Neanderthal in The Neanderthal Museum, Germany. Source Wikipedia.
Image credit Ökologi
 
Writing in TG Daily, Emma Woollacott reports that the examination of food particles trapped in the teeth of Neanderthal remains have –
 
…revealed the human ancestor Australopithecus sediba ate bark – analysis of microscopic bits of food trapped between the teeth – they’ve established that Neanderthals cooked plants, including bitter-tasting ones that have medicinal properties. Until recently, Neanderthals, who disappeared between 30,000 and 24,000 years ago, were thought to be predominantly meat-eaters.
 

Researchers from Spain, the UK and Australia combined pyrolysis gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry with morphological analysis of plant microfossils to identify material trapped in dental calculus – calcified dental plaque – from five Neanderthals from the north Spanish site of El Sidrón.

 
Full articlehere.
 
 

View original post

Viking Age Ships & Shipbuilding Part III


Building is Believing: Norway’s Stave Churches


mediaevalmusings

Norway today is a very Christian country. The king sits at the head of a national church, supported by the state, and most Norwegians–although they might not attend every Sunday service–will be baptised, confirmed, married, and buried under its aegis. At the same time, however, contemporary Norwegian society remains not only aware, but also proud of its pre-Christian forebears, the pagan warriors and seafarers who populate the saga literature and skaldic verse. These legacies–Christian and pagan–have played an enduring role in the shaping of a Norwegian national identity, and point to the importance of the Middle Ages to the texture of Scandinavian history.

The Middle Ages itself, and the 10th-13th centuries in particular, were a time of great change in northern Europe, as previously pagan lands began the slow process of Christianisation and adopted cultural norms from the Christian heartlands. In the area which would become Norway, exposure to Christianity…

View original post 616 more words

Viking Age Ships & Shipbuilding Part I


Viking Age Ships & Shipbuilding Part II


The Oseberg Viking Ship – and her Copy


Thyra Dane

In 1903 a farmer close to the Norwegian city of Tønsberg – a large city in the Viking age – stumbled over part of a Viking ship from around 834. The ship was used in a burial and was almost in one piece when it was found. Two women were buried there and speculations have run wild as to whom these two women were. There is no doubt that they – or at least one of them –  were rich since they`ve eaten plenty of meat all their lives. Poorer people ate more fish.

Woman from the Middle East?

There is a bit of debate about one of the women and whether she was old and rich as well or if she was younger and possibly a slave. I think the latest research has concluded that both women were older and rich. An interesting side-story is how one test showed…

View original post 272 more words

Viking Age Ships & Shipbuilding Part I


Why we MUST speak out against a new South African Police Service “occult-related” crimes division in South Africa.


Why we SHOULD speak out against an SAPS occult-related crimes division in S.A.
BY FRANCISCO FUMAROLA.

After the leaked memo from the SAPS concerning the establishment of a new occult related crimes division, South African Pagans have been expressing their concerns. Yet, I have found that these concerns were for the most part brushed aside in the media and by comments from the SAPS. It would even seem that people generally feel as if the SAPS know what they are doing and in the end that they have everyone’s best interest at heart. “They are going after criminals and crimes committed. The memo clearly states that they will not persecute religious groups.” This is a common statement to brush aside our concerns and even imply that we are somehow being crazy or exaggerating the whole thing. The memo has a lot of cringe-worthy, shocking and outright ridiculous statements conveniently overlooked because apparently the SAPS seems to have grown up quite a bit since the days of Kobus Jonker and the former Occult Related Crimes division or people think that we are “more enlightened” today and such a unit poses no threat.
Read the rest of this entry »http://www.penton.co.za/?p=2576

ALSO SEE:

“On my desk sits a most chilling tome. An anthology of misinformation; filled with confusing images, twisted words and blatant lies.  Servamus’ Drugs and Occult-Related Crime: The Facts, The Answers is the Malleus Maleficarum of our generation. This propaganda publication has been, and still is, used as a witches’ hammer against constitutionally protected minority religions.   And with the resurrection of SAPS’ Occult-Related Crime Unit in 2012, Pagans, Witches, Occultists, Satanists and Vampyres are facing a possible new wave of propaganda and persecution at the hands of the next-generation of witch-hunters; each trained under the old master of SA’s own ‘satanic panic’- Kobus Jonker.”

BY BRON KATZKE

Read the rest of this entry » http://www.penton.co.za/?p=2596
Video

Barbarian Combat (Germanic Style)


Germanic fighting at the time of the Romans
(also where the Germanic warriors fight on horseback as well as paint themselves pitch-black for night attacks)

PART 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Tk89Z_PsQs
PART 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mo4y3dXYtww&feature=relmfu
PART 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktDpwqKP8oQ&feature=relmfu
PART 4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrIyiEgkH7g&feature=relmfu
PART 5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVW5JAzTjEI&feature=relmfu

Book Review: Warfare and Society in the Barbarian West 450-900


Medieval Musings

Warfare and Society in the Barbarian West 450-900

Guy Halsall

Routledge, London, 2003

I personally found this work to be a disappointment; from the title I was hoping to find a new insightful work to illuminate what is generally an overlooked period in European military history. What I found was an introductory work covering a broad spectrum of space and time, and drawing heavily upon specialized works on the subject that I had previously read. There was very little new information to be found. Yet in its way this is perhaps a strength of the book – for someone who is unfamiliar with the topic it is an excellent beginning, and covers much of the standard literature on the subject, while the bibliography will lead the scholar to more specialized texts.

In many respects the book reads like a summary of a course delivered by a college professor – and…

View original post 235 more words

De Re Militari