Two boosts for “human transport” of the bluestones


The Heritage Journal

Controversy over how the bluestones arrived at Stonehenge – by human transport or glaciers – has been raging for decades but we noticed two recent stories that seem to boost the lead enjoyed by the proponents of human transport.

First, there’s English Heritage’s Stonehenge Cycle Challenge. Next year Members will be invited to “an exclusive sponsored cycle ride, which traces the route of the Stonehenge bluestones from Wales to Wiltshire.” The 3-day journey will comprise Preseli Hills to Llandovery (day one), Llandovery to Chepstow via Brecon Beacons (day two) and Chepstow to Stonehenge (day three). So not exactly the proposed original route (or is it?) as there’s no mention of sailing across the Bristol Channel, but still it’s a sort of acknowledgement that human legs, not ice, were originally involved. EH seem to have made one big mistake though: the ride will end “inside the stone circle with…

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Maeshowe: Chamber of secrets


The Heritage Trust

Historic Scotland TV writes –

The chambered tomb of Maeshowe is in The Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site. Along with the Standing Stones of Stenness, the Ring of Brodgar, the Barnhouse settlement and Skara Brae prehistoric village, it allows visitors to understand the landscape and monuments of our ancestors more than 5000 years ago.

In 2011 laser scanners were used to record the site and create a three dimensional model to show the intricacies of this incredible site.

Writing in Current Archaeology, Carly Hilts reports that –

Orkney is world-famous for its spectacular Neolithic archaeology, and now visitors from all over the globe will be able to explore one of its most enigmatic monuments, after a new virtual tour of Maeshowe chambered tomb went live today (29 August).

In a video unveiled yesterday by Scotland’s Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, the structure of the 5,000 year old monument…

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