Magdeburg Cathedral bones confirmed as oldest English royal remains


King Harold Day

Confirmation that bones found in a tomb in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany, are of  a Saxon princess, the oldest English royal remains to be found.   The bones are part of the body of the Saxon princess Eadgyth, the granddaughter of King Alfred the Great, who died more than 1,000 years ago.

The tomb where they were found was first investigated in 2009, but it was then believed the bones had been moved.   Two years ago German archaeologists opened the tomb, expecting it to be empty, but found it contained a lead box with the inscription, “The remains of Queen Eadgyth are in this sarcophagus”.   The bones were inside, wrapped in silk.

The latest techniques have been used by experts from the University of Mainz and the University of Bristol to analyze the bones and some teeth found in the upper jaw.   It was discovered they belonged to a female who died aged between…

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Giants of Wessex


The Heritage Trust

 
The Marlborough Mound by William Stukeley
 
A talk by Jim Leary, of English Heritage, entitled Giants of Wessex: Silbury Hill, the Marlborough Mound, and the Hatfield Barrow will take place on the 12 March 2013 from 19:30 at the Salisbury & South Wiltshire Museum. The museum announces that –
 

Over the last few years the three giant round mounds of Wessex have seen some form of archaeological work. In 2007 and 2008 Silbury Hill was the focus of a multi-million pound project which included opening and retracing the 1968 tunnel into the heart of the Hill. 2010 saw excavations at Marden, one of the largest Neolithic henge monuments in Britain, which provided evidence for the now demolished mound known as the Hatfield Barrow – said to have been as much as 15m tall. Whilst, in the autumn of that year coring work through the Marlborough Mound produced six…

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Oude uitspraak van een Engelsman


SjpielseWolf

“Wanneer men de oude gegevens bestudeert, dan blijkt dat onze grootheid op en neer gaat met de levende vruchtbaarheid van onze grond. En nu is het zo gesteld, dat vele jaren van uitgeputte en chemisch vermoorde grond en van gedevitaliseerd voedsel daaruit, onze lichamen verzwakt en, nog erger, ons nationaal karakter ontkracht heeft. Nu is het de beurt van de worm om de mannelijkheid van Engeland te versterken.” En hij gaat dan voort met de natuurlijke mest aan te prijzen om te herwinnen “Our punch, our character, our lost virtues”.

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Bede’s ‘Wilfaresdun’


Senchus

I suppose this qualifies as one of my occasional ‘non-Scottish’ blogposts as it doesn’t deal with places or events in Scotland. There is, however, a slight Scottish connection, because the main event referred to here marked a significant milestone in the career of Oswiu, king of Bernicia, whose realm included parts of what are now Lothian and the Borders.

We begin with the words of an Englishman, the Venerable Bede, writing c.730 at the Northumbrian monastery of Jarrow. In Book 3, Chapter 14 of his Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Bede tells us that two northern English kings prepared to do battle with one another in the summer of 651. One was Oswine, ruler of Deira, a kingdom roughly coterminous with the pre-1974 county of Yorkshire. The other was Oswiu of Bernicia, whose territory lay north of the River Tees and whose chief citadel lay on the imposing…

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Senlac Hill or Crowhurst – Where was the battle fought!


King Harold Day

Today we came across a new-to-us website, which looks of great interest to those interested in King Harold II, the last Anglo Saxon King of England.   It is called Secrets of the Norman Invasion, and is all about a suggested alternative Sussex site of the Norman invasion and battlesite.   It says:-

“This blog is to keep people up to date with what is happening at the investigations that are taking place in Crowhurst and at Upper Wilting Farm, where the Normans landed and fought the most famous battle in history.   This unique heritage site is World Heritage Site potential, now under threat again from the development of the A259 link road.

Archaeological investigation is taking place at the site, and a large number of artefacts have been found.   The site is threatened by a proposed road development.   There is also a book called   The Secrets Of The Norman…

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