Meyer’s Longsword – The Wechselhauw or Change Cut


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

The Change Cut is simply to change off before your opponent with your cuts, from one side to another, from above to below, and vice versa, in order to confuse him.

I’m tempted to interpret this as beginning the cut along one line and then changing to a different line midway through the action. This can be done with any sword, but is particularly effective with the longsword because of the extra mobility offered by the two-handed grip. However, I believe that is actually called Fehien or Failing.

So for the time being I’m sticking to what I wrote in Talhoffer 1467 Plate 2 Right. Specifically, this is just a cut used to change lines or guard rather than to attack with.

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Meyer’s Longsword – The Kniecheihauw or Wrist Cut


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

This is a subtype of the Zwerch used in the middle of the fight. It seems like more of an attack of opportunity than something one would do intentionally.

This is so called from the body part to which it is directed. Do it thus: After the initial Onset, when you have come under your opponent’s sword with your hands up above your head, and he holds his head thus between his arms, then cut with Thwart Cuts under his pommel up toward his wrist-bones or wrist-joints. If he holds his hands too high, then cut with these Thwart Cuts up from below toward the knob of his elbows; thus it is done.

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Meyer’s Longsword – The Blendthauw or Blind Cut


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

This is simply a tip cut to the face. It seems to be more of a harassing move in anticipation for a more definitive strike.

Bind your opponent from your right on his sword; in the bind, wind through below with your hilt or haft toward [your] left side. When your opponent tries to slip after the winding, then nimbly flick the foible, that is the point, at his head from your right at his left with crossed hands. Quickly wind back through, or wrench to your left side with the short edge; thus you have executed the Blind Cut. This Blind Cut is done in many ways; there will be more about it in the section on devices.

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Arguments for the Winding Krumphauw over the Windshield Wiper Krumphauw in Meyer


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

I know of three variants of the Krumphau, which I will refer to as the Pynenberg version, Knight’s version, and the Other version.

Knight uses a window-wiper motion as shown here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zs1fuRl77fQ&list=UUBsDIGcIhlamARsPHYEJkzg&index=1&feature=plcp EDIT: I mistook Knight’s version for a short-edge, window-wiper krump. He uses a long edge window-wiper, which requires changing some of the arguments.

Pynenberg uses a long-edge cut that mutates into a short-edge: http://vimeo.com/49951783

Textual Argument 1

Meyer writes,

This cut is executed thus: stand in the Wrath Guard with your left foot forward; if your opponent cuts at you, then step with your right foot well out from his stroke toward his left side; cut with the long edge and crossed hands against his cut, or across on his hands between his head and blade, and let the blade shoot well over his arm, as can be seen in Image D in the figures on the upper…

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Practice Notes: Why Longsword Fencers should Learn Italian Rapier


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

Take a look at Capoferro plate 11:

image

Imagine C’s right knee on the ground and D’s longsword laying flat and useless on his shoulder. That’s how I was punked last Wednesday.

I’m not saying that you should necessarily learn to throw this strike, it is enough to be aware that exists and works remarkably well with the longsword.

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Practice Notes: Scheitelhau, the Parting Strike, with Broken Steps


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

Scheitelhau, or the Parting Cut, is the last of the five Master Cuts. Like the other master cuts it begins with the Zornhau, which the ancients call the Father Stroke. And like any other cut, it it to be performed with a step.

The trick here is that step is broken. Meyer writes,

Thirdly there are the broken or stolen steps, which are done thus: act as if you intend to step forward with the one foot, and before you set it down, step backwards with it behind the other foot. Since these properly belong in the rapier I swill save it for there.

I have to admit I discovered this by accident. As I started my Zornhau I thought, “Ha! You’ve over-reached and I can void your pitiful cut by aborting my step.” While I focused on that, my Zornhau was left to its own devices. Without my body…

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The Rose 2: Meyer’s techniques for the Longsword


From Drills to Free Play: Putting Practice into Practice (Part II)


Bill Grandy, Director of Historical Swordsmanship at the Virginia Academy of Fencing

In Part I of this article we explored a few variations of drills to help develop both tactical proficiency as well as fluidity between actions under pressure. Those drills allowed more dynamism than static drills, and yet they are still a step apart from full out free play.

When engaging in free play, one has to accept that it is less of a learning exercise and more of a test of one’s abilities under fire. While learning occurs, the moment your brain goes into competitive mode it is spending less time analyzing previous maneuvers and more time adapting to the present and future maneuvers. Because of this, in order to gain the most out of your free play, you should consider variations that limit you and force you to adapt certain tactics.

Here we will look at some…

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Why Fight? The Objectives of Liechtenauer’s Fencing