History News: Burial Plans for Richard III


You're History!

A new article from the BBC describes tentative plans for burying the skeleton exhumed from a parking lot near Bosworth, where King Richard III met his violent end in battle. Examination of the bones has yielded evidence of injuries consistent with those known to have caused his death. The spine reveals scoliosis, which may explain the claim that Richard was “hunchbacked”. Current plans, if DNA testing confirms that the skeleton is Richard’s, call for re-interring him in Leicester Cathedral, close to the place he died. Some are criticizing that idea, however, because the king had expressed his wish to be buried at York Minster.

I favor York, myself…. I know they’ll take that into consideration.

Full article: BBC News – Richard III dig: Leicester Cathedral burial confirmed.

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Neolithic circles in Britain damaged by retired businessman


The Heritage Trust

In a similar act of heritage vandalism to the one reported below in China, a retired businessman has been found guilty of causing unprecedented damage earlier this year to one of Britain’s ancient Neolithic sites. 73 year-old Roger Penny bought the Priddy Circles in Somerset as a ‘pension investment’. The Circles, which date to 3,000bce, are a Scheduled Ancient Monument and were probably built around the same time as Stonehenge. The Mail Online reports yesterday that –

They [the Priddy Circles] have been described by English Heritage as ‘probable Neolithic ritual or ceremonial monuments similar to a henge’. Penny hired two contractors to ‘tidy’ and renovate the area, near the village of Priddy on Somerset’s Mendip Hills, but failed to get permission from English Heritage. One contractor used rubble to fill swallet holes, natural holes inside the ring which may be the key to its creation. Moving a gate led…

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Vikings in Wales


Antiquarian's Attic

 Ancient skeleton could shed new light on the history of the Vikings in Wales

LYING crookedly in a shallow grave, its bones have existed undiscovered for more than 1,000 years.
But the discovery of this ancient skeleton could shed new light on the history of the Vikings in Wales

The unearthing skeleton in at Llanbedrgoch on Anglesey has given historians important new clues on the impact of both Anglo-Saxons and Vikings operating around the Irish Sea.
Archaeologists from the National Museum Wales said the burial find is an unexpected addition to a group of five – two adolescents, two adult males and one woman – discovered in 1998-99.
Originally thought to be victims of Viking raiding, which began in the 850s, this interpretation is now being revised.
The unusual non-Christian positioning of the body, and its treatment, point to distinctions being made in the burial practices for Christians and other…

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Warrior Queen Boudica Documentary


Metal Gaia

 

Boudica is the Queen of the British Iceni tribe who led a revolt against the Romans in 60 AD.

Her husband, the original ruler, was an ally with Rome.

When he died, Boudica took over.

Yet the Romans did not respect a female ruler and decided that this would be the ideal time to annex her kingdom.

Boudica was publicly humiliated (flogged) and her daughters were raped.

Yet the Iceni people had a strong amount of respect for their queen.

With her people behind her, Boudica led a revolt against the Romans that would go down in history.

Read More About Boudica and other Ancient Celtic Women

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