Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies


Metal Gaia

Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies

A Facebook Source for Heathenry and Germanic Lore

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Vikings and Native Americans


Metal Gaia

History may paint a violent picture of the Vikings.

But there is evidence that they may have been peacefully trading with Native Americans

for hundreds of years.

All without driving them to extinction in fact!

Click Here To Read More About It 

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archaeological Saxon information


SjpielseWolf

Completely different, but very enriching information about the early history of the Saxons was the archaeological research in Saksenland (Old Saxony). One of the archaeologists looked at the contributions of his colleagues as some parts of a great mosaic which was far from complete. But the excavating of settlements, the exposing of numerous grave-fields and the many artefacts gave not only an image of the daily lives of the Saxons in the early Middle Ages; they also gave information about:

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Magdeburg Cathedral bones confirmed as oldest English royal remains


King Harold Day

Confirmation that bones found in a tomb in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany, are of  a Saxon princess, the oldest English royal remains to be found.   The bones are part of the body of the Saxon princess Eadgyth, the granddaughter of King Alfred the Great, who died more than 1,000 years ago.

The tomb where they were found was first investigated in 2009, but it was then believed the bones had been moved.   Two years ago German archaeologists opened the tomb, expecting it to be empty, but found it contained a lead box with the inscription, “The remains of Queen Eadgyth are in this sarcophagus”.   The bones were inside, wrapped in silk.

The latest techniques have been used by experts from the University of Mainz and the University of Bristol to analyze the bones and some teeth found in the upper jaw.   It was discovered they belonged to a female who died aged between…

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Vikings in Wales


Antiquarian's Attic

 Ancient skeleton could shed new light on the history of the Vikings in Wales

LYING crookedly in a shallow grave, its bones have existed undiscovered for more than 1,000 years.
But the discovery of this ancient skeleton could shed new light on the history of the Vikings in Wales

The unearthing skeleton in at Llanbedrgoch on Anglesey has given historians important new clues on the impact of both Anglo-Saxons and Vikings operating around the Irish Sea.
Archaeologists from the National Museum Wales said the burial find is an unexpected addition to a group of five – two adolescents, two adult males and one woman – discovered in 1998-99.
Originally thought to be victims of Viking raiding, which began in the 850s, this interpretation is now being revised.
The unusual non-Christian positioning of the body, and its treatment, point to distinctions being made in the burial practices for Christians and other…

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Giants of Wessex


The Heritage Trust

 
The Marlborough Mound by William Stukeley
 
A talk by Jim Leary, of English Heritage, entitled Giants of Wessex: Silbury Hill, the Marlborough Mound, and the Hatfield Barrow will take place on the 12 March 2013 from 19:30 at the Salisbury & South Wiltshire Museum. The museum announces that –
 

Over the last few years the three giant round mounds of Wessex have seen some form of archaeological work. In 2007 and 2008 Silbury Hill was the focus of a multi-million pound project which included opening and retracing the 1968 tunnel into the heart of the Hill. 2010 saw excavations at Marden, one of the largest Neolithic henge monuments in Britain, which provided evidence for the now demolished mound known as the Hatfield Barrow – said to have been as much as 15m tall. Whilst, in the autumn of that year coring work through the Marlborough Mound produced six…

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Archaeology: Europe’s ‘oldest town’ found near Bulgaria’s Varna, professor says


Ancientfoods

20121015-105520.jpg

Topic: Ancient village

Archaeology: Europe’s ‘oldest town’ found near Bulgaria’s Varna, professor says

Europe’s oldest urban settlement is near Provadia, a town of about 13 000 people about 40km inland from Bulgaria’s Black Sea city of Varna, according to archaeology Professor Vassil Nikolov, citing evidence from work done at the Provadia – Solnitsata archaeological site in summer 2012.

The team of archaeologists headed by Nikolov excavated stone walls estimated to date from 4700 to 4200 BCE. The walls are two metres thick and three metres high, and according to Nikolov are the earliest and most massive fortifications from Europe’s pre-history.

There were about 300 to 350 people living at the site in those times, living in two-storey houses and earning their living by salt mining.

To this day, Provadia is an important salt centre, with a large-scale foreign investor represented in the area. Estimates are that salt has been extracted…

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Link

Settlement and Field Structures in continental North-West Europe from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Settlement and Field Structures in continental North-West Europe from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries

By Adriaan Verhulst

Medieval Settlement Research Group, Vol.13 (1998)

Introduction: Since the eighties and increasingly during the nineties there has been a renewed interest on the continent in medieval rural settlement, mainly among archaeologists and geographers. This overview of research in this field in continental north-west Europe during recent decades is intended to explain this development.

From the middle of the fifties English scholars pioneered medieval field archaeology. They founded the Deserted Medieval Villages Research Group, later changed to Medieval Village Research Group and now since 1985 the Medieval Settlement Research Group. Their work, set up by Maurice Beresford and John Hurst, provoked great interest on the continent.

Although the German geographical tradition in the field of “Settlement History” (Siedlungsgeschichte) with illustrious names like Gradmann, Martiny, Niemeier, Muller-Wille and Mortensen. was continued after the war by Anneliese Krenzlin, Martin Born and Hans-Jurgen Nitz, a decisive step to a renewal of the subject on the English model were the conferences organised during the seventies by the famous archaeologist Herbert Jankuhn under the auspices of the Gottingen Academy. Several volumes on the early medieval village and on early medieval fields resulted from these meetings between archaeologists, historians, geographers and linguists. The importance of the yearbook Siedlungsforschung. Archdologie-Geschichte-Geographie, edited since 1983 by Klaus Fehn, testifies to the liveliness of research on rural settlements in central and continental north-west Europe.

The Bartlow Burial Mounds: Kite Aerial Photographs by Bill Blake


The Heritage Trust

Kite Aerial Photograph by Bill Blake Heritage Documentation: all rights reserved, used with permission. Note path on the left which leads from Bartlow Church 

In our inaugural article, almost a year ago, we featured an ancient Romano-British site (the Bartlow Burial Mounds, formerly in Essex but after boundary changes now in Cambridgeshire) that has suffered from three of the hazards highlighted in our header – ie Bartlow is a site which has fallen foul (relatively recently) from development, neglect and vandalism. According to the Cambridgeshire Rural Society the Bartlow Burial Mounds (also known as the Bartlow Hills) “…was originally the largest group of Roman barrows in northern Europe and includes the highest burial mound in Britain.”
 
The noticeboard at the foot of one of the mounds records that, “The seven mounds covered extraordinary rich burials containing a collection of wonderful artistic objects, the best found in Britain. Mound IV, the…

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A Neanderthal trove in Madrid


Ancientfoods

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Topic: More on Neanderthal

The Lozoya River Valley, in the Madrid mountain range of Guadarrama, could easily be called “Neanderthal Valley,” says the paleontologist Juan Luis Arsuaga.

“It is protected by two strings of mountains, it is rich in fauna, it is a privileged spot from an environmental viewpoint, and it is ideal for the Neanderthal, given that it provided the with good hunting grounds.”

This is not just a hypothesis: scientists working on site in Pinilla del Valle, near the reservoir, have already found nine Neanderthal teeth, remains of bonfires and thousands of animal fossils, including some from enormous aurochs (the ancestor of cattle, each the length of two bulls), rhinoceros and fallow deer.

The Neanderthal is a human species that is well known and unknown at the same time. It is well known because numerous vestiges have been found from the time when they lived in Europe, between…

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Albuquerque 14/88 Skinhead Claims Asatru: We Say NO!


Circle Ansuz

As reported in the Albuquerque Journal on August 24th racist skinhead and Aryan Nations member Brian Pulliam was arrested as a suspect in the killing of his girlfriend, Kirsten Landeau and her 20 year old nephew Dillon Cearfoss. On the 26th Albuquerque Journal writer Scott Sandlin exposed that previous to Pulliman’s release, the killer tried to claim that his religion prevented him from being released. Pulliam said his religion would set him at odds with the terms of his probation as he has to consume alcohol beverages as an adherent of Asatru.  Obviously this is total nonsense. But the bigger picture here is how Asatru is reported in the mainstream media. It is no wonder the outside world thinks Heathens are all male, White, violent and Nazis. It seems as if the only time we are covered by the media is in relation to racial violence and…

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Setting of Duddo Stone Circle saved again, for a while.


The Heritage Journal

Not for the first time the setting of Duddo Stone Circle, said to be the most complete and dramatically situated of Northumbrian stone circles, has been under threat from a proposal to build a wind turbine.

Scottish company 3R Energy Solutons want to build a 74-metre, 800 kilowatt machine on farmland at Shoreswood, south of Berwick but the proposal has just been unanimously rejected by county councillors, following advice from the County Archaeologist that it would result in “significant and unacceptable” impact on the setting of the monument which is less than two miles  away.

Case officer Frances Wilkinson said: “It is considered that the proposal would have a very damaging effect on the appreciation of the Duddo Stone Circle from the main approach and that its setting would not be preserved. Significant weight does need to be given to the benefits of the proposal, however, the harm to…

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Clean Vikings


Thyra Dane

I mentioned in an earlier post that I would write about  myths about the Vikings. One of the biggest myths is that the Vikings were dirty and unwashed. Everything is relative, of course, and compared to people of today who shower every day and use tons of beauty products, they may seem rather poorly groomed.

But compared to their contemporaries – not to mention people who lived a couple of hundred years later when washing was considered life threatening – the Vikings were very cleanly. Archaeologists have found a large number of tweezers, combs, nail cleaners, ear cleaners and tooth picks.

 

There are also reports to support idea of the clean Vikings, like this one from John of Wallingford:

Apparently the incoming Danes “…caused much trouble to the natives of the land; for they were wont, after the fashion of their country, to comb their hair every day, to…

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Coetan Arthur: Sub-megalithic tomb


The Heritage Trust

We’re often asked where the megalithic tomb (which we use for our banner image) is located. The tomb (of the sub-megalithic type) is located north of Whitesands Bay at St Davids Head, Pembrokeshire, south-west Wales and is known as Coetan Arthur. Here’s a full frame photo of the tomb.
 
 
Coetan Arthur sub-megalithic tomb
©
The Heritage Trust 
 
 
Another taken with Whitesands Bay in the background
©
The Heritage Trust
 
 
 
And another with Carn Llidi in the distance
©
The Heritage Trust
 
 

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Two boosts for “human transport” of the bluestones


The Heritage Journal

Controversy over how the bluestones arrived at Stonehenge – by human transport or glaciers – has been raging for decades but we noticed two recent stories that seem to boost the lead enjoyed by the proponents of human transport.

First, there’s English Heritage’s Stonehenge Cycle Challenge. Next year Members will be invited to “an exclusive sponsored cycle ride, which traces the route of the Stonehenge bluestones from Wales to Wiltshire.” The 3-day journey will comprise Preseli Hills to Llandovery (day one), Llandovery to Chepstow via Brecon Beacons (day two) and Chepstow to Stonehenge (day three). So not exactly the proposed original route (or is it?) as there’s no mention of sailing across the Bristol Channel, but still it’s a sort of acknowledgement that human legs, not ice, were originally involved. EH seem to have made one big mistake though: the ride will end “inside the stone circle with…

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Maeshowe: Chamber of secrets


The Heritage Trust

Historic Scotland TV writes –

The chambered tomb of Maeshowe is in The Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site. Along with the Standing Stones of Stenness, the Ring of Brodgar, the Barnhouse settlement and Skara Brae prehistoric village, it allows visitors to understand the landscape and monuments of our ancestors more than 5000 years ago.

In 2011 laser scanners were used to record the site and create a three dimensional model to show the intricacies of this incredible site.

Writing in Current Archaeology, Carly Hilts reports that –

Orkney is world-famous for its spectacular Neolithic archaeology, and now visitors from all over the globe will be able to explore one of its most enigmatic monuments, after a new virtual tour of Maeshowe chambered tomb went live today (29 August).

In a video unveiled yesterday by Scotland’s Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, the structure of the 5,000 year old monument…

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Stories of Sheebeg


Story Archaeology

 An Acallam na nÉces Special

In the West of Ireland, every hill is a hollow hill, and every well is a source.  But the hill we live on has many legends…

Join the Story Archaeologists on an aerial survey of the story-scape of Sídh Beag, the Small Fairy Hill.

 

 

Don’t forget to subscribe to get the latest podcasts!

by The Story Archaeologists

Music: “Sheemore and Sheebeg” by Turlough O’Carolan, performed byRehouven Libine

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Use of medicinal plants by Neanderthals discovered


The Heritage Trust

 
Reconstruction of a Neanderthal in The Neanderthal Museum, Germany. Source Wikipedia.
Image credit Ökologi
 
Writing in TG Daily, Emma Woollacott reports that the examination of food particles trapped in the teeth of Neanderthal remains have –
 
…revealed the human ancestor Australopithecus sediba ate bark – analysis of microscopic bits of food trapped between the teeth – they’ve established that Neanderthals cooked plants, including bitter-tasting ones that have medicinal properties. Until recently, Neanderthals, who disappeared between 30,000 and 24,000 years ago, were thought to be predominantly meat-eaters.
 

Researchers from Spain, the UK and Australia combined pyrolysis gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry with morphological analysis of plant microfossils to identify material trapped in dental calculus – calcified dental plaque – from five Neanderthals from the north Spanish site of El Sidrón.

 
Full articlehere.
 
 

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