Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies


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Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies

A Facebook Source for Heathenry and Germanic Lore

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Vikings and Native Americans


Metal Gaia

History may paint a violent picture of the Vikings.

But there is evidence that they may have been peacefully trading with Native Americans

for hundreds of years.

All without driving them to extinction in fact!

Click Here To Read More About It 

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Vikings in Wales


Antiquarian's Attic

 Ancient skeleton could shed new light on the history of the Vikings in Wales

LYING crookedly in a shallow grave, its bones have existed undiscovered for more than 1,000 years.
But the discovery of this ancient skeleton could shed new light on the history of the Vikings in Wales

The unearthing skeleton in at Llanbedrgoch on Anglesey has given historians important new clues on the impact of both Anglo-Saxons and Vikings operating around the Irish Sea.
Archaeologists from the National Museum Wales said the burial find is an unexpected addition to a group of five – two adolescents, two adult males and one woman – discovered in 1998-99.
Originally thought to be victims of Viking raiding, which began in the 850s, this interpretation is now being revised.
The unusual non-Christian positioning of the body, and its treatment, point to distinctions being made in the burial practices for Christians and other…

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Giants of Wessex


The Heritage Trust

 
The Marlborough Mound by William Stukeley
 
A talk by Jim Leary, of English Heritage, entitled Giants of Wessex: Silbury Hill, the Marlborough Mound, and the Hatfield Barrow will take place on the 12 March 2013 from 19:30 at the Salisbury & South Wiltshire Museum. The museum announces that –
 

Over the last few years the three giant round mounds of Wessex have seen some form of archaeological work. In 2007 and 2008 Silbury Hill was the focus of a multi-million pound project which included opening and retracing the 1968 tunnel into the heart of the Hill. 2010 saw excavations at Marden, one of the largest Neolithic henge monuments in Britain, which provided evidence for the now demolished mound known as the Hatfield Barrow – said to have been as much as 15m tall. Whilst, in the autumn of that year coring work through the Marlborough Mound produced six…

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Anthropology Museum Offers Ability to Adopt an Artifact of Indigenous Cultures


International Museum of Cultures Blog

The International Museum of Cultures (IMC), a unique Anthropology museum in Dallas, allows the public to help preserve artifacts of indigenous cultures from around the world.

Through “Adopting an Artifact,”a patron will become an advocate for ethnic and cultural diversity, thereby furthering the mutual respect and peace between peoples of this world. Adopting an artifact creates an emotional bond between the patron and the artifact, along with the culture of the artifact’s origin.

The IMC recognize the person, family, classroom, or even a business, that adopts an artifact by displaying a small plaque along with the QR code in the museum near their adopted artifact for others to see.

Adoption cost
$250 dollars (tax deductible)

Program Benefits:

  • Receive a limited 3 month membership
  • 15% discount to the gift shop
  • A certificate of adoption
  • A photograph of the artifact
  • Information about the artifact
  • A QR code for smart phones.

For…

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“Do documentaries exploit their subjects?”


Exploitation by documentary film-makers… Really? Never actually gave it any thought

Strategically Communicating

In their chapter on reality TV and Documentaries, O’Shaughnessy and Stadler explain that there are two issues that they identify with Documentary films. One of them is the issue of exploiting the “subjects” featured in the film and “victimizing” them. The point they bring is valuable and in my opinion, there are other instances when journalists end up betraying their source in one way or another.

My intention here is not list times when exploitation or betrayal has happen but to introduce a new idea, a new approach to documentary film making and journalism in general: a community-based and participatory research model. Some of my academic background is in Anthropology and it might be news to you, but the reputation of Anthropologists and Archeologists in certain communities is pretty negative. For generations, communities have felt exploited by researchers who studied them, used them as “subjects”, and used their data to…

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Link

Settlement and Field Structures in continental North-West Europe from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Settlement and Field Structures in continental North-West Europe from the Ninth to the Thirteenth Centuries

By Adriaan Verhulst

Medieval Settlement Research Group, Vol.13 (1998)

Introduction: Since the eighties and increasingly during the nineties there has been a renewed interest on the continent in medieval rural settlement, mainly among archaeologists and geographers. This overview of research in this field in continental north-west Europe during recent decades is intended to explain this development.

From the middle of the fifties English scholars pioneered medieval field archaeology. They founded the Deserted Medieval Villages Research Group, later changed to Medieval Village Research Group and now since 1985 the Medieval Settlement Research Group. Their work, set up by Maurice Beresford and John Hurst, provoked great interest on the continent.

Although the German geographical tradition in the field of “Settlement History” (Siedlungsgeschichte) with illustrious names like Gradmann, Martiny, Niemeier, Muller-Wille and Mortensen. was continued after the war by Anneliese Krenzlin, Martin Born and Hans-Jurgen Nitz, a decisive step to a renewal of the subject on the English model were the conferences organised during the seventies by the famous archaeologist Herbert Jankuhn under the auspices of the Gottingen Academy. Several volumes on the early medieval village and on early medieval fields resulted from these meetings between archaeologists, historians, geographers and linguists. The importance of the yearbook Siedlungsforschung. Archdologie-Geschichte-Geographie, edited since 1983 by Klaus Fehn, testifies to the liveliness of research on rural settlements in central and continental north-west Europe.

The Bartlow Burial Mounds: Kite Aerial Photographs by Bill Blake


The Heritage Trust

Kite Aerial Photograph by Bill Blake Heritage Documentation: all rights reserved, used with permission. Note path on the left which leads from Bartlow Church 

In our inaugural article, almost a year ago, we featured an ancient Romano-British site (the Bartlow Burial Mounds, formerly in Essex but after boundary changes now in Cambridgeshire) that has suffered from three of the hazards highlighted in our header – ie Bartlow is a site which has fallen foul (relatively recently) from development, neglect and vandalism. According to the Cambridgeshire Rural Society the Bartlow Burial Mounds (also known as the Bartlow Hills) “…was originally the largest group of Roman barrows in northern Europe and includes the highest burial mound in Britain.”
 
The noticeboard at the foot of one of the mounds records that, “The seven mounds covered extraordinary rich burials containing a collection of wonderful artistic objects, the best found in Britain. Mound IV, the…

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A Neanderthal trove in Madrid


Ancientfoods

20121008-114641.jpg

Topic: More on Neanderthal

The Lozoya River Valley, in the Madrid mountain range of Guadarrama, could easily be called “Neanderthal Valley,” says the paleontologist Juan Luis Arsuaga.

“It is protected by two strings of mountains, it is rich in fauna, it is a privileged spot from an environmental viewpoint, and it is ideal for the Neanderthal, given that it provided the with good hunting grounds.”

This is not just a hypothesis: scientists working on site in Pinilla del Valle, near the reservoir, have already found nine Neanderthal teeth, remains of bonfires and thousands of animal fossils, including some from enormous aurochs (the ancestor of cattle, each the length of two bulls), rhinoceros and fallow deer.

The Neanderthal is a human species that is well known and unknown at the same time. It is well known because numerous vestiges have been found from the time when they lived in Europe, between…

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Setting of Duddo Stone Circle saved again, for a while.


The Heritage Journal

Not for the first time the setting of Duddo Stone Circle, said to be the most complete and dramatically situated of Northumbrian stone circles, has been under threat from a proposal to build a wind turbine.

Scottish company 3R Energy Solutons want to build a 74-metre, 800 kilowatt machine on farmland at Shoreswood, south of Berwick but the proposal has just been unanimously rejected by county councillors, following advice from the County Archaeologist that it would result in “significant and unacceptable” impact on the setting of the monument which is less than two miles  away.

Case officer Frances Wilkinson said: “It is considered that the proposal would have a very damaging effect on the appreciation of the Duddo Stone Circle from the main approach and that its setting would not be preserved. Significant weight does need to be given to the benefits of the proposal, however, the harm to…

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Coetan Arthur: Sub-megalithic tomb


The Heritage Trust

We’re often asked where the megalithic tomb (which we use for our banner image) is located. The tomb (of the sub-megalithic type) is located north of Whitesands Bay at St Davids Head, Pembrokeshire, south-west Wales and is known as Coetan Arthur. Here’s a full frame photo of the tomb.
 
 
Coetan Arthur sub-megalithic tomb
©
The Heritage Trust 
 
 
Another taken with Whitesands Bay in the background
©
The Heritage Trust
 
 
 
And another with Carn Llidi in the distance
©
The Heritage Trust
 
 

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Two boosts for “human transport” of the bluestones


The Heritage Journal

Controversy over how the bluestones arrived at Stonehenge – by human transport or glaciers – has been raging for decades but we noticed two recent stories that seem to boost the lead enjoyed by the proponents of human transport.

First, there’s English Heritage’s Stonehenge Cycle Challenge. Next year Members will be invited to “an exclusive sponsored cycle ride, which traces the route of the Stonehenge bluestones from Wales to Wiltshire.” The 3-day journey will comprise Preseli Hills to Llandovery (day one), Llandovery to Chepstow via Brecon Beacons (day two) and Chepstow to Stonehenge (day three). So not exactly the proposed original route (or is it?) as there’s no mention of sailing across the Bristol Channel, but still it’s a sort of acknowledgement that human legs, not ice, were originally involved. EH seem to have made one big mistake though: the ride will end “inside the stone circle with…

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Maeshowe: Chamber of secrets


The Heritage Trust

Historic Scotland TV writes –

The chambered tomb of Maeshowe is in The Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site. Along with the Standing Stones of Stenness, the Ring of Brodgar, the Barnhouse settlement and Skara Brae prehistoric village, it allows visitors to understand the landscape and monuments of our ancestors more than 5000 years ago.

In 2011 laser scanners were used to record the site and create a three dimensional model to show the intricacies of this incredible site.

Writing in Current Archaeology, Carly Hilts reports that –

Orkney is world-famous for its spectacular Neolithic archaeology, and now visitors from all over the globe will be able to explore one of its most enigmatic monuments, after a new virtual tour of Maeshowe chambered tomb went live today (29 August).

In a video unveiled yesterday by Scotland’s Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, the structure of the 5,000 year old monument…

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Stories of Sheebeg


Story Archaeology

 An Acallam na nÉces Special

In the West of Ireland, every hill is a hollow hill, and every well is a source.  But the hill we live on has many legends…

Join the Story Archaeologists on an aerial survey of the story-scape of Sídh Beag, the Small Fairy Hill.

 

 

Don’t forget to subscribe to get the latest podcasts!

by The Story Archaeologists

Music: “Sheemore and Sheebeg” by Turlough O’Carolan, performed byRehouven Libine

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Use of medicinal plants by Neanderthals discovered


The Heritage Trust

 
Reconstruction of a Neanderthal in The Neanderthal Museum, Germany. Source Wikipedia.
Image credit Ökologi
 
Writing in TG Daily, Emma Woollacott reports that the examination of food particles trapped in the teeth of Neanderthal remains have –
 
…revealed the human ancestor Australopithecus sediba ate bark – analysis of microscopic bits of food trapped between the teeth – they’ve established that Neanderthals cooked plants, including bitter-tasting ones that have medicinal properties. Until recently, Neanderthals, who disappeared between 30,000 and 24,000 years ago, were thought to be predominantly meat-eaters.
 

Researchers from Spain, the UK and Australia combined pyrolysis gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry with morphological analysis of plant microfossils to identify material trapped in dental calculus – calcified dental plaque – from five Neanderthals from the north Spanish site of El Sidrón.

 
Full articlehere.
 
 

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Palaeolithic animators at work 30,000 years ago?


The Heritage Trust

Amanda Crum writing in WebProNews reports that –

News out of France concerning Prehistoric cave drawings that were animated by torch-light is taking the art history world by storm, and has overwhelmed this artist to the point of awe.

The cave drawings were found by archaeologist Marc Azema and French artist Florent Rivere, who suggest that Palaeolithic artists who lived as long as 30,000 years ago used animation effects on cave walls, which explains the multiple heads and limbs on animals in the drawings. The images look superimposed until flickering torch-light is passed over them, giving them movement and creating a brief animation.

“Lascaux is the cave with the greatest number of cases of split-action movement by superimposition of successive images. Some 20 animals, principally horses, have the head, legs or tail multiplied,” Azéma said.

Full article here. See also our earlier feature on the bowl discovered in a…

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“Die Welt der Kelten”, Stuttgart


A closer look at what the Chiseldon cauldrons are made of


British Museum blog

High magnification image of one of the cauldrons

Quanyu Wang, scientist, British Museum

I am a scientist specialising in metalworking technology, particularly in relation to non-precious metals such as iron and copper-alloys. The scientific examination and analysis of the Chiseldon Iron-Age cauldrons is a key aspect of the investigative process as a whole and is crucial in supporting our understanding of them.

For the Chiseldon cauldrons I have been examining the microstructure of the metal under very high magnification in order to see its composition, deduce how it was worked and explore manufacturing techniques. Some of the questions I will be trying to answer include: ‘How were the cauldrons made?’, ‘Were different components from an individual vessel made in the same workshop?’, ‘Were the same parts, such as the iron handles for different vessels, made from the same metal stocks’ and, perhaps the most important question of all; ‘Were the cauldrons made especially for burial or collected together…

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