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Empathy represses analytic thought, and vice versa: Brain physiology limits simultaneous use of both networks


Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies


Metal Gaia

Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies

A Facebook Source for Heathenry and Germanic Lore

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Magdeburg Cathedral bones confirmed as oldest English royal remains


King Harold Day

Confirmation that bones found in a tomb in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany, are of  a Saxon princess, the oldest English royal remains to be found.   The bones are part of the body of the Saxon princess Eadgyth, the granddaughter of King Alfred the Great, who died more than 1,000 years ago.

The tomb where they were found was first investigated in 2009, but it was then believed the bones had been moved.   Two years ago German archaeologists opened the tomb, expecting it to be empty, but found it contained a lead box with the inscription, “The remains of Queen Eadgyth are in this sarcophagus”.   The bones were inside, wrapped in silk.

The latest techniques have been used by experts from the University of Mainz and the University of Bristol to analyze the bones and some teeth found in the upper jaw.   It was discovered they belonged to a female who died aged between…

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Appalling News: Ash Trees are Threatened and Politicians are Brain-Dead


Francis Pryor - In the Long Run

The Forestry Commission have just announced that a deadly disease of native ash trees has been imported into Britain and has escaped and been found on their land in East Anglia. In fairness, the Commission staff are moving heaven and earth to stop/contain it and have done much to raise the public’s interest in the threat. This development potentially marks the start of a process that will lead to the permanent mutilation of the British Rural landscape. Dutch Elm Disease was bad, catastrophic even, but this will be far, far worse. I am at my wit’s end: why, oh why, didn’t politicians do anything about it, before it was too late? The situation is exactly like it was when Dutch Elm Disease was imported. The pathogen was known to be across the sea and lay beneath the bark; so we on our little island continued to import trees with bark intact. It…

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Mediaeval manuscripts used as dust jackets


King Harold Day

We have found a really interesting story about how mediaeval manuscripts were used in the 17th and 18th centuries as “stuffing” in the binding of books or as dust jackets.   And it comes from Edmonton, not the one near us, but Edmonton, Alberta, in Canada.

The story starts like this:-  “The book before me is huge and heavy, bound, not in paper or cardboard, but with planks of solid oak, held together by thick cords.   It looks like a prop from a fantasy film. It’s actually a Latin dictionary, published in the early 1700s.”   But here’s the secret:-   “But as old as the dictionary appears, it hides a secret far older.   Inside the heavy oak cover is a parchment liner.    Other pieces of the same parchment are stuffed into the spine, to bind the book block together.   The parchment wrapper is far older than the dictionary:  a medieval manuscript, hand-written on calfskin…

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Alexander the Great made the island of Tyre into a peninsula


Wonderland1981 - The Wonderland Murders

The city of Tyre is in southern Lebanon on the Mediterranean coast. It is one of the oldest cities in the World. It used to be an island over 2,000 years ago. Now, it is a peninsula… a man-made peninsula. This was done with a bit of help from Alexander the Great and mother nature.

In ancient times, the island city of Tyre was heavily fortified (with defensive walls 150 feet (46 m) high) and the mainland settlement, originally called Ushu (later called Palaetyrus, meaning “Old Tyre,” by the Greeks) was actually more like a line of suburbs than any one city and was used primarily as a source of water and timber for the main island city.

In 332 BC, the city was conquered by Alexander the Great, after a siege of seven months in which he built the causeway from the mainland to within a hundred meters…

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A Neanderthal trove in Madrid


Ancientfoods

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Topic: More on Neanderthal

The Lozoya River Valley, in the Madrid mountain range of Guadarrama, could easily be called “Neanderthal Valley,” says the paleontologist Juan Luis Arsuaga.

“It is protected by two strings of mountains, it is rich in fauna, it is a privileged spot from an environmental viewpoint, and it is ideal for the Neanderthal, given that it provided the with good hunting grounds.”

This is not just a hypothesis: scientists working on site in Pinilla del Valle, near the reservoir, have already found nine Neanderthal teeth, remains of bonfires and thousands of animal fossils, including some from enormous aurochs (the ancestor of cattle, each the length of two bulls), rhinoceros and fallow deer.

The Neanderthal is a human species that is well known and unknown at the same time. It is well known because numerous vestiges have been found from the time when they lived in Europe, between…

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Setting of Duddo Stone Circle saved again, for a while.


The Heritage Journal

Not for the first time the setting of Duddo Stone Circle, said to be the most complete and dramatically situated of Northumbrian stone circles, has been under threat from a proposal to build a wind turbine.

Scottish company 3R Energy Solutons want to build a 74-metre, 800 kilowatt machine on farmland at Shoreswood, south of Berwick but the proposal has just been unanimously rejected by county councillors, following advice from the County Archaeologist that it would result in “significant and unacceptable” impact on the setting of the monument which is less than two miles  away.

Case officer Frances Wilkinson said: “It is considered that the proposal would have a very damaging effect on the appreciation of the Duddo Stone Circle from the main approach and that its setting would not be preserved. Significant weight does need to be given to the benefits of the proposal, however, the harm to…

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Coetan Arthur: Sub-megalithic tomb


The Heritage Trust

We’re often asked where the megalithic tomb (which we use for our banner image) is located. The tomb (of the sub-megalithic type) is located north of Whitesands Bay at St Davids Head, Pembrokeshire, south-west Wales and is known as Coetan Arthur. Here’s a full frame photo of the tomb.
 
 
Coetan Arthur sub-megalithic tomb
©
The Heritage Trust 
 
 
Another taken with Whitesands Bay in the background
©
The Heritage Trust
 
 
 
And another with Carn Llidi in the distance
©
The Heritage Trust
 
 

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