Indiculus superstitionum et paganiarum


SjpielseWolf

Because this little Index almost certain has been prepared by Anglo-Saxon missionaries in Utrecht (Netherlands) the listed misuses not specific Frankish but also Saxon and Frisian.

Nodfyr - a concept known in all cultures

Customs that the church qualified as heathen and sinful and had to be contested were:

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It’s Deadly At the Top — The Age Old Tradition of Executing Generals


Military History Now

North Korea’s new leader, Kim Jong Un, is cleaning house in the upper echelons of his army. The 29-year-old totalitarian dictator reportedly executed one of his most senior generals this past week for drinking alcohol, according to an article on the Daily Telegraph. The story reports that the Hermit Kingdom is still in a period of mourning following the death of the previous leader, Kim Jong Il. As such, the consumption of booze is prohibited. Astonishingly, the execution was carried out not by a firing squad but by a mortar crew. The disgraced army vice minister was ordered to be “obliterated” by a precision-fired mortar round. North Korea has a history of executing generals (and executing them in bizarre ways). In the late 1990s, a group of DPRK generals who were suspected of treason were doused with gasoline and burned alive before a capacity crowd at Pyongyang’s May Day…

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Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies


Metal Gaia

Johannesburg Heathen & Germanic Studies

A Facebook Source for Heathenry and Germanic Lore

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History News: Burial Plans for Richard III


You're History!

A new article from the BBC describes tentative plans for burying the skeleton exhumed from a parking lot near Bosworth, where King Richard III met his violent end in battle. Examination of the bones has yielded evidence of injuries consistent with those known to have caused his death. The spine reveals scoliosis, which may explain the claim that Richard was “hunchbacked”. Current plans, if DNA testing confirms that the skeleton is Richard’s, call for re-interring him in Leicester Cathedral, close to the place he died. Some are criticizing that idea, however, because the king had expressed his wish to be buried at York Minster.

I favor York, myself…. I know they’ll take that into consideration.

Full article: BBC News – Richard III dig: Leicester Cathedral burial confirmed.

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Vikings and Native Americans


Metal Gaia

History may paint a violent picture of the Vikings.

But there is evidence that they may have been peacefully trading with Native Americans

for hundreds of years.

All without driving them to extinction in fact!

Click Here To Read More About It 

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Meyer’s Longsword – The Wechselhauw or Change Cut


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

The Change Cut is simply to change off before your opponent with your cuts, from one side to another, from above to below, and vice versa, in order to confuse him.

I’m tempted to interpret this as beginning the cut along one line and then changing to a different line midway through the action. This can be done with any sword, but is particularly effective with the longsword because of the extra mobility offered by the two-handed grip. However, I believe that is actually called Fehien or Failing.

So for the time being I’m sticking to what I wrote in Talhoffer 1467 Plate 2 Right. Specifically, this is just a cut used to change lines or guard rather than to attack with.

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archaeological Saxon information


SjpielseWolf

Completely different, but very enriching information about the early history of the Saxons was the archaeological research in Saksenland (Old Saxony). One of the archaeologists looked at the contributions of his colleagues as some parts of a great mosaic which was far from complete. But the excavating of settlements, the exposing of numerous grave-fields and the many artefacts gave not only an image of the daily lives of the Saxons in the early Middle Ages; they also gave information about:

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Neolithic circles in Britain damaged by retired businessman


The Heritage Trust

In a similar act of heritage vandalism to the one reported below in China, a retired businessman has been found guilty of causing unprecedented damage earlier this year to one of Britain’s ancient Neolithic sites. 73 year-old Roger Penny bought the Priddy Circles in Somerset as a ‘pension investment’. The Circles, which date to 3,000bce, are a Scheduled Ancient Monument and were probably built around the same time as Stonehenge. The Mail Online reports yesterday that –

They [the Priddy Circles] have been described by English Heritage as ‘probable Neolithic ritual or ceremonial monuments similar to a henge’. Penny hired two contractors to ‘tidy’ and renovate the area, near the village of Priddy on Somerset’s Mendip Hills, but failed to get permission from English Heritage. One contractor used rubble to fill swallet holes, natural holes inside the ring which may be the key to its creation. Moving a gate led…

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Magdeburg Cathedral bones confirmed as oldest English royal remains


King Harold Day

Confirmation that bones found in a tomb in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany, are of  a Saxon princess, the oldest English royal remains to be found.   The bones are part of the body of the Saxon princess Eadgyth, the granddaughter of King Alfred the Great, who died more than 1,000 years ago.

The tomb where they were found was first investigated in 2009, but it was then believed the bones had been moved.   Two years ago German archaeologists opened the tomb, expecting it to be empty, but found it contained a lead box with the inscription, “The remains of Queen Eadgyth are in this sarcophagus”.   The bones were inside, wrapped in silk.

The latest techniques have been used by experts from the University of Mainz and the University of Bristol to analyze the bones and some teeth found in the upper jaw.   It was discovered they belonged to a female who died aged between…

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Prehistoric gold lozenge to go on display


The Heritage Trust

4,000 year-old gold lozenge from Bush Barrow, Wiltshire England

This is Wiltshire reports on the 21 October that –

A priceless prehistoric gold lozenge excavated in the 19th century will be put on public display for the first time when the new Neolithic gallery at Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes opens next year. The museum was awarded a £370,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund earlier this year to finance the new gallery, which will be built at the rear of the museum and is due to open in May. Secure display units will enable the museum to show items that were thought too valuable for public display.

Foremost of these is the large gold lozenge that was found in the Bush Barrow grave near Stonehenge, dating from around 1900BC, which was excavated by William Cunnington in 1808. David Dawson, director of the museum, said: “A replica of the lozenge…

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Bible Translations You Should Be Using


Made of Ƿ

If you’re a medievalist, that is. This post is about Bible translations for research purposes, not for personal devotion. When using Bibles for research, as one will definitely need to do when studying English-language literature, it’s important to have a Bible translation as a linguistic baseline and as a relevant reference for the period.

Middle Ages

The Latin Vulgate was the primary Bible translation used during the Middle Ages, though one will find sections of vernacular translation and occasional scholars who can read the Greek or Hebrew. Ideally, a medievalist should be able to read Latin and should be using the Vulgate. However, if your research is not in-depth enough to make it worth your time to learn Latin, use the Douay-Rheims version, which is the English translation of the Vulgate. Since the D-R is translated from Latin and not Hebrew and Greek, it is not the best translation…

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Medieval Monday – What Did the Middle Ages Smell Like?


Merry Farmer

So there I was the other day, driving home from work, caught in traffic, stuck behind a car whose exhaust system needed serious attention.  As I wrinkled my nose and said, “Eew, gross” the thought hit me:  We like to think that we live in a pristine, modern world that smells sweet while looking back in time and assuming everything stank like sewage all the time.  But did it?

Uneducated modern thinkers might assume that because there was no running water in the Middle Ages everything was dirty and smelly.  Well, if you’ve known me and heard me talk about history long enough then you know that nothing galls me more than this completely false assumption.  As I discussed at length last year in my blog post about how medieval people did bath, frequently, hygiene was far more advanced a thousand years ago than modern people assume.

True.  Running…

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The Bryastovetz Horned Helmet


Velsen


New at LacusCurtius & Livius

There’s no particular reason to put online this drawing by Graham Sumner, except for the best reason of all: that I like it. What you see is the Roman naval base at Velsen, just west of Amsterdam, which was in use during the reign of the emperor Tiberius. It is almost certainly identical to the fort named Flevum mentioned by Tacitus. You can read more about it here, or in Edge of Empire.

You can order Edge of Empirehere.

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Meyer’s Longsword – The Kniecheihauw or Wrist Cut


Grauenwolf's Study of Western Martial Arts

This is a subtype of the Zwerch used in the middle of the fight. It seems like more of an attack of opportunity than something one would do intentionally.

This is so called from the body part to which it is directed. Do it thus: After the initial Onset, when you have come under your opponent’s sword with your hands up above your head, and he holds his head thus between his arms, then cut with Thwart Cuts under his pommel up toward his wrist-bones or wrist-joints. If he holds his hands too high, then cut with these Thwart Cuts up from below toward the knob of his elbows; thus it is done.

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4,000 year-old heritage site destroyed in China


The Heritage Trust

 
 
Cultural heritage site in China’s Henan Province destroyed
 
TheShanghai Daily reports on the 24 October that –
 
A developer in central China’s Henan Province is facing severe punishment after destroying a 4,000-year-old cultural heritage site for a construction project, ignoring warnings from local authorities, officials said yesterday.
 
1 meter deep ground level of the Longshan Cultural site of Shang and Zhou dynasties (c. 16th century-256 BC) in Zhengzhou City was damaged by bulldozers, said Xin Yingjun, director of the excavation department of the city’s cultural heritage bureau. Debris of ancient pottery jars, bowls and goblets have been found in the earth dug out by bulldozers and experts were evaluating the age of the cultural relics, Xin said.
 
…before construction was due to start, experts and officials with the bureau found a 93-meter-long, 26-meter-wide and 2.3-meter-deep cultural heritage site full of cultural relics and…

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